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JANUARY 2019

DATABANK 14. 1800-1849
19TH CENTURY MAGAZINES

        This edition of the Magazine Museum’s web sight highlights the magazines of the 19th Century, the years 1800-1849.Magazines began to flourish by 1800. Some say it was the Postal Act of 1794 which caused this increase, by allowing that magazines “may be transported in the mails”. Others believed it was just the shear numbers of magazines begun rather than any financial boost. Whatever the reasons, magazines had become, as the Pennsylvania Gazette described them, the “universal instructor”. There were no public libraries in America in the early 19th Century. Printed information and communication had to be acquired by the individual(or family).Magazines slowly became the main purveyors of the American culture. By the mid 1830’s, magazines had become a meaningful force in American life. As Frank Luther Mott states in his A History of the American Magazines, “the influence of the early magazines was probably far greater than the number printed and circulated would indicate.”

   This century saw the continued transformation of periodicals from newspapers to what we now know as “magazines”.But this transformation did not happen overnight. Most of the magazines listed here were still more newspaper than magazine. It was well into the latter half of the century that magazines acquired definite covers and were printed with what we now know as magazine formats.

   The overwhelming majority of subject matter of this period was of a religious nature. Religion-based publications seemed to last longer than other types of magazines. The biggest problem for historians, and anyone wishing to follow the history of individual titles in this period, was the frustrating habit of magazines to change names. Publishers and editors have always attempted to incorporate deceased publications into existing,continuing publications. It seems to be the nature of the publishing business to do so. But this, of course causes confusion, and frustration, by those of us attempting to document and understand magazine history. Religious publications seem to be more involved than any other, in both changing names frequently, and also absorbing defunct titles into on-going titles. Hence, all of the numbers listed after the titles here. That is our attempt at showing title changes and continuations of publications.

   We have four hundred ninety magazines listed here for the time period. Of course, there were a few more publications actually printed throughout the world in these years. As of this date, we have not the resources to list every magazine that existed in each time period.But we are working on that.

   This Data Bank represents a concerted effort on our part to collect accurate information on magazines and magazine history. We believe it is of the utmost importance to maintain this data in a usable central location. We hope this information is of use to one and all.

Adding to the difficulty of listing as many magazines as possible, is the continued practice of the magazine business to continue names as titles. Magazine names are bought and sold and passed on, sometimes even after the magazine has ceased to exist. If a title is continued, the new name may, or may not, represent the same entity. Life magazine in the seventies was not the same magazine as Life magazine in the twenties. We have attempted to distinguish these similarities by numbering the magazine names in our list. For instance, Rolling Stone #2 is the music magazine started by Jann Wenner in San Francisco in 1967, not the political satire magazine of the same name published in Austin Texas in 1894. Also adding to the complexities of listing magazine data is the difficult task of listing a periodical's ending date. Our solution is to use the words "present" and "current". "Present" means a magazine was still in existence at the time our databank was compiled. "Current" is used to show the last date known for the magazine, with the assumption that it may, or may not, still be published.

    This Data Bank represents a concerted effort on our part to collect accurate information on magazines and magazine history. We believe it is of the utmost importance to maintain this data in a usable central location. We hope this information is of use to one and all.

 

 

1800-1849

 

 

1800-1849